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About the Shuar

About the Shuar

Translator Nataly Kelly’s article gives an introduction to the Shuar people, one of the largest Amazonian indigenous groups, of which poet María Clara Sharupi Jua is a member.

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The Adventures of ‘Beauty’

The Adventures of ‘Beauty’

The Afghan poet, Partaw Naderi, was invited to take part in the PTC’s first World Poets’ Tour in 2005. In this article he writes about the excitment he felt at being invited to the UK and he reveals the true inspiration behind his poem, ‘Beauty’.

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Three Mexican Poets

Three Mexican Poets

Tom Boll introduces the work of the three distinguished Mexican poets, Coral Bracho, David Huerta and Victor Teran, each of whom ‘offers a distinctive version of what it means to live in Mexico today’.

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Some Thoughts on Co-Translating Gaarriye

Some Thoughts on Co-Translating Gaarriye

W N Herbert offers a fascinating insight into how he approached co-translating Somali poetry. In this essay he describes his induction into the marvellous complexities of Somali verse and how he came to terms with the formal dexterities of Gaarriye’s ‘non-lyric’ poetry.

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Translating Corsino Fortes

Translating Corsino Fortes

Prize-winning translator, Daniel Hahn, writes about how he approached translating Corsino Fortes’s poems with Sean O’Brien. This was Daniel’s first experience of translating poetry, and his first as a co-translator and he’s very interesting on how he felt his role was to ‘defend’ the original poems.

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Translating Farzaneh Khojandi

Translating Farzaneh Khojandi

Jo Shapcott enthuses about the ‘magic’ of translating Farzaneh Khojandi with Narguess Farzad. She talks about the ‘daunting’ challenges she faced coming to terms with a poet whose work ‘seemed worlds away from the modern, urban context of my own work’.

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Translating Kajal Ahmad

Translating Kajal Ahmad

Mimi Khalvati expresses her desire to preserve, ‘The sweetness and simplicity of [Kajal’s] voice, the political and personal passion, the directness and immediacy of the address ... [together with her] sense of humour and the fable-like quality of the poems’, in the translations she made with Choman Hardi.

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